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2020 Seniors: Quotes Wall


Here are some quotations, memories, and parting thoughts from members of the UNC-CH Linguistics class of 2020!

My love for linguistics was solidified my first semester at Carolina in LING 101, when we were talking about infixation. Professor Becker asked us if English uses infixes to modify words, like it uses prefixes and suffixes. We were all sure of ourselves nodding “no.” Professor Becker had a huge smile on her face, and went, “abso-freaking-lutely, it does!” That class was my favorite of my entire college career–and why I’m graduating with a linguistics major.

—Nicole Maria Gagliardi

“There is no such thing as an ugly accent, like there’s no such thing as an ugly flower.”

—Hannah Isley

I’ll miss this department but I will not miss the stairs that go up to Dey 304.

—Anna Truelove

“Language is the most massive and inclusive art we know…”
(Edward Sapir)

—Kat Blandford

I’m sure all of us remember LING 101 and being confused why everyone else thought it was so hard. And most of us have randomly had a recording of Lyra and Olivia play on iTunes at an inopportune moment. There’s stereotypes about every major but I’ve always told my friends: linguistics majors are just weird…but I guess I’m one of them! I’m so lucky to have been part of this awesome, intellectually curious, and passionate community.

—Danielle du Preez

I loved being the president of UnderLing and planning the linguistics game nights! IPA Scrabble is my favorite!

—Katie Distefano

I have always felt that language is fascinating and important, but I never knew how to convey that to those who think about language as just a communication tool. The Linguistics Department taught me how to explain the many roles language plays in society and how to think about language academically.

—Elizabeth Stamey

“Without language, thought is a vague, uncharted nebula.”
(Ferdinand de Saussure)

When I was a kid, I wanted to be an architect. I was fascinated by the ways in which rooms flowed together—their function as well as their interconnected structure—and how the entirety of the construction stood without swiftly collapsing like a house of cards. And then some years later I studied grammar, and it was then I understood my affinity toward language: a structure, an order to the ways in which words come together to create a house of meaning.

—Dillon Bolding