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New Graduate Certificate in Computational Linguistics


The Department of Linguistics is pleased to announce a new Graduate Certificate program in Computational Linguistics jointly administered by the Department of Computer Science and the School of Information and Library Science. This program provides students who wish to work in the areas of machine translation, machine learning, speech-to-text software, natural language processing, natural language generation, and artificial intelligence with an understanding of human language structure and the skills of linguistic analysis as well as the computational tools to develop software applications to parse and generate human language.

Students complete 9 credit hours (3 courses) and attend a monthly brown bag seminar for the duration of their time in the program.

New Graduate Certificate in Computational Linguistics approved for fall 2020...

Linguistics at Google


We had a mini-reunion of UNC linguists in June in Mountain View, CA. Misha Becker met with alums Emily Moeng, Ph.D., 2018, and Nolan Danley, BA, 2016, who now work at Google. Emily and Nolan shared insights about what aspects of their training in linguistics has been most helpful for their current work in the tech industry.They also kindly offered to assist current linguistics students who are hoping to find internships or work in this industry after graduation.

We had a mini-reunion of UNC linguists in June in Mountain View, CA. Misha Becker met with alums Emily Moeng, Ph.D., 2018, and Nolan Danley, BA, 2016, who now work at Google...

Marc Adam Eisdorfer Award


The Marc Adam Eisdorfer Award was established in 1998 by Sandra Eisdorfer in memory of her son, Marc Adam Eisdorfer, a graduate of the class of 1984. It recognizes the senior judged most outstanding in academic achievement in Linguistics. This year, seniors Kristen Lavery, pictured here with Interim Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz, and Danielle Dupreez were honored with this prestigious award at the Chancellor's Awards ceremony on April 16, 2019. Congratulations, Danielle and Kristen!

The Marc Adam Eisdorfer Award was established in 1998 by Sandra Eisdorfer in memory of her son, Marc Adam Eisdorfer, a graduate...

American Sign Language


For the first time, the Department of Linguistics is offering an introductory course in American Sign Language, ASL, through the Summer School. Our instructor this year is Judith Labath, a longtime instructor of ASL at UNC Greensboro. We hope to expand our offerings in ASL in the coming years.

For over thirty years, Judith Labath has considered herself professionally as a sign language interpreter, yet she has spent many of those years teaching American Sign Language and Interpreting classes at six universities between Illinois, Alabama, and North Carolina. She is delighted to be teaching summer school at the University of North Carolina.

As an instructor, Judith's aim is to share her enthusiasm and interest in American Sign Language as well as her passion and respect for the Deaf community with my students. To assist our students to reach their potential as sign language users, we believe it is essential to teach in the target language.

For the first time, the Department of Linguistics is offering an introductory course in American Sign Language, ASL, through the Summer School...

Professor J. Michael Terry's Summer


This summer, Professor J. Michael Terry spent the bulk of June as a summer resident at the National Humanities Center. Located in Research Triangle Park in Durham NC, the core of the Center’s mission is to provide a space to stimulate intellectual community and the productive exchange of ideas within the humanities. As one of the of the 36 scholars from eighteen institutions awarded summer residency fellowships, he used his time there work on his current project concerning the role of dialectal difference in educational achievement.

After leaving the Center, Professor Terry headed to UC Davis to teach Introduction to Semantics at the Linguistic Society of American Summer Institute. Quoting from the Institute’s webpage "Since 1928, the Linguistic Institutes have not only been the premier gatherings of their kind, attracting top professionals and students from around the world and throughout the subfields. They are also defining moments for individual scholars, host institutions, and the field itself, fondly remembered decades later by the participants."

This summer, Professor J. Michael Terry spent the bulk of June as a summer resident at the National Humanities Center. Located in Research...